Science

Planet Orbiting Dead Star

Humanity has existed for 300,000 years, give or take a millennium. That might sound like a long time when the average human lives at most a few decades, but it’s really just a cosmic blink of the eye. Even if Homo sapiens exceeds all expectations and survives both political strife …

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Physicists Unprecedented Precision

Physicists have performed an improved measurement of the free neutron lifetime using the UCNτ apparatus at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Their results, published in the journal Physical Review Letters, represent a more than two-fold improvement over previous measurements. Gonzalez et al. report an improved measurement of the free …

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Quantum Teleportation

Quantum teleportation of an unknown input state from an outside source onto a quantum node is considered one of the key components of long-distance quantum communication protocols. It has already been demonstrated with pure photonic quantum systems as well as atomic and solid-state spin systems linked by photonic channels. Now, …

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Tardigrade Fossil Discovered

Again with the accidental discoveries! It’s the third unexpected find within six weeks. This time, the good news was born from debris in a hunk of Dominican amber. The researchers were studying ants from the Miocene period, trapped in a piece of amber. A closer look at the “debris” inclusions, …

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Red Blood Cells

A team of biologists from the University of Surrey, the MRC Laboratory for Molecular Biology, Wake Forest University and the École Centrale de Lyon has discovered that red blood cells generate an electric field voltage that appears outside and not just within, meaning each cell acts as a tiny electrode. …

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Giant Sea Scorpion

A new genus and species of mixopterid eurypterid (sea scorpion) has been identified from several fossil specimens found in the Xiushan Formation, China. Life reconstruction of Terropterus xiushanensis. Image credit: Dinghua Yang. Terropterus xiushanensis lived approximately 435 million years ago during the Llandovery epoch of the Silurian period. The ancient …

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Milanese Friar And North America

The Cronica universalis, written in Latin by the Milanese friar Galvaneus Flamma (in Italian, Galvano Fiamma, 1283 – c. 1345), contains an astonishing reference to a land named Marckalada (terra que dicitur Marckalada), situated west from Greenland. This land is recognizable as the Markland mentioned by some Icelandic sources and …

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Neurotoxicity in Alzheimer’s

Fenchol, a natural compound commonly present in some plants including basil (Ocimum basilicum), decreases Alzheimer’s disease pathology by activating the free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2) signaling, according to new research published in the journal Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience. Fenchol, a plant-derived compound that gives basil its aromatic scent, can …

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Discovered in Japan

Scientists have isolated a new orthonairovirus from two patients showing acute febrile illness with thrombocytopenia and leukopenia after tick bite in Hokkaido, Japan. Transmission electron microscopy of YEZV particles negatively stained with 2% phosphotungstic acid. Image credit: Kodama et al., doi: 10.1038/s41467-021-25857-0. Orthonairoviruses are tick-borne viruses in the genus Orthonairovirus, …

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Oxygenic Photosynthesis

Using a new gene-analyzing technique, researchers from MIT and elsewhere have found that all extant species of cyanobacteria can be traced back to a common ancestor that evolved around 2.9 billion years ago. They’ve also found that the ancestors of cyanobacteria branched off from other bacteria around 3.4 billion years …

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