Science

Carrion Crows Can Volitionally Control Their Calls, Researchers Say

Carrion crows (Corvus corone), a species of songbird in the family of Corvidae, can voluntarily control the release and onset of their calls, suggesting that songbird calls are under cognitive control, according to new research from the University of Tübingen, Germany. The carrion crow (Corvus corone). Image credit: Ian Kirk …

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Study Provides New Insights into Honeybee ‘Waggle Dance’ Communication

According to a study published in the journal eNeuro (bioRxiv.org preprint), changes in vibration-sensitive neurons may equip forager honeybees for waggle dance communication. A honeybee (Apis mellifera). Image credit: Vijaya Narasimha. Honeybees (Apis mellifera) are social insects. As they mature, adult honeybees engage in four primary social roles — cleaners, …

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Dogs are Good for Your Heart Health: Study

People who have dogs are more likely to achieve the recommended level of behavioral cardiovascular health metrics such as physical activity and diet than non-owners of dogs, according to a new study published in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings: Innovations, Quality Outcomes. Pet owners, especially people who have dogs, are more …

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New Caledonian Crows Enjoy Using Tools, Study Finds

New Caledonian crows (Corvus moneduloides) are well-known for their sophisticated tool use. According to a new study, these birds behave optimistically after tool use. The findings, published in the journal Current Biology, raise the possibility that enjoyment may be a fundamental cause in the evolution of tool use and other …

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Jurassic Pterosaurs Were Filter-Feeders, Study Says

A new study led by Uppsala University researchers provides the first direct evidence of filter feeding in Jurassic pterosaurs and shows that they had a similar diet to the Chilean flamingo (Phoenicopterus chilensis). An artist’s impression of the Cretaceous pterosaur Pterodaustro. Image credit: Nobu Tamura, spinops.blogspot.com / CC BY 3.0. …

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Triassic-Era Mammal Relative Had Saber Teeth

A new species of cynodont has been identified from a fossilized skull found in the San Juan province, Argentina. An artist’s impression of Pseudotherium argentinus. Image credit: Agencia CTyS-UNLaM. The extinct mammal relative, named Pseudotherium argentinus, lived during the Triassic period, about 231 million years ago. “Pseudotherium argentinus lived in …

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