Science

Arctic Woolly Mammoth

Scientists have examined isotopes collected from the tusk of a woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) that lived in Alaska approximately 17,100 years ago, during the latest Ice Age, to elucidate its movements and diet; this included its time — likely with a herd — as an infant and juvenile, then as …

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Great Apes Use Signals

In a paper published this week in the journal iScience, an international team of researchers documented chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) purposefully using signals to start and then end social activities, a behavior not seen outside of the human species until now. Joint action structure of chimpanzees and bonobos …

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New Orchid Species

An international team of botanists has discovered three new endemic species of the orchid genus Lepanthes in the highlands of Ecuador. Lepanthes oro-lojaensis growing in its natural habitat. Image credit: Francisco Tobar Suarez. Lepanthes is a large genus of orchids with up to 1,000 species distributed in the Neotropics. The …

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Fasting Can Protect From Infections

Fasting before and during exposure to invasive food-borne bacteria protects mice from developing a full-blown gastrointestinal infection, in part through the actions of the gut microbiome, according to new research led by University of British Columbia scientists. Graef et al. highlight how food intake controls the complex relationship between host, …

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World’s Earliest Coin Mint

Archaeologists have uncovered 2,640- to 2,550-year-old clay moulds for casting spade coins as well as fragments of finished spade coins at Guanzhuang in Xingyang, Henan province, China. The technical characteristics of the moulds demonstrate that the site — which was part of the Eastern Zhou period (770-220 BCE) bronze foundry …

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New Feathered Dinosaur

Paleontologists in Brazil have unveiled a new species of unenlagiine dromaeosaurid dinosaur from the Maastrichtian age of the Cretaceous period. An artist’s reconstruction of two individuals of Ypupiara lopai foraging in an alluvial river, the setting of the Marilia Formation during the Maastrichtian age of the Cretaceous period. Image credit: …

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Avian Brain Shape Dinosaurs

A team of paleontologists has digitally reconstructed the facial skeleton and brain endocast of Ichthyornis dispar, a toothed stem bird that lived in North America during the Late Cretaceous epoch and has traditionally been considered the nearest known well-understood relative of living birds. The ancestors of living birds had a …

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Bumblebees of Flowers

Buff-tailed bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) are able to use differences in floral humidity to distinguish between rewarding and non-rewarding flowers, according to new research led by biologists from the University of Bristol and the University of Exeter. By experimentally varying the levels of floral humidity in artificial flowers within a range …

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DNA Found in Georgian Cave

An international team of scientists has retrieved and analyzed nuclear and mitochondrial environmental DNA of humans, wolfs (Canis lupus), and bisons (Bison bonasus) from a 25,000-year-old sediment sample from the Upper Paleolithic site of Satsurblia Cave, western Georgia, Caucasus. Gelabert et al. retrieved human and mammalian nuclear and mitochondrial environmental …

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CERN Physicists Triple W

Physicists from the ATLAS Collaboration at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have observed a process called WWW production: the simultaneous creation of three massive W bosons in high-energy proton-proton collisions. Display of a candidate WWW→ 3 leptons + neutrinos event; the event is identified by its decay to a muon …

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