Tag Archives: research

Protoplanetary Disk

Around 4.567 billion years ago, our Solar System harbored a gap within the protoplanetary disk, near the location where the main asteroid belt resides today, and likely shaped the composition of the planets, according to a study led by MIT scientists. This is an artist impression of the protoplanetary disk …

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Red Blood Cells

A team of biologists from the University of Surrey, the MRC Laboratory for Molecular Biology, Wake Forest University and the École Centrale de Lyon has discovered that red blood cells generate an electric field voltage that appears outside and not just within, meaning each cell acts as a tiny electrode. …

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Spotted Skunk Species

A team of U.S. scientists led by Chicago State University has analyzed species limits and diversification patterns in spotted skunks using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA datasets from broad geographic sampling representing all currently recognized species — Spilogale angustifrons, Spilogale gracilis, Spilogale putorius, and Spilogale pygmaea — and subspecies. A spotted …

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Better Black Tea

Physicists from the Department of Health Science and Technology in the Institute of Food Nutrition and Health at the ETH Zürich have applied the science of rheology to the seemingly quaint purpose of improving the quality of a cup of black tea. Black tea brewed in tap water; whereas tea …

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Crystalline Nitriles

Titan, Saturn’s icy moon, is an ideal planetary body to study prebiotic chemistry, origins of life, and the potential habitability of an extraterrestrial environment. It has a nitrogen-based atmosphere, complex organic chemistry fueled by radiation from the Sun and Saturn’s magnetosphere, hydrocarbon lakes, organic dunes on the equator, and seasonal …

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Arctic Woolly Mammoth

Scientists have examined isotopes collected from the tusk of a woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) that lived in Alaska approximately 17,100 years ago, during the latest Ice Age, to elucidate its movements and diet; this included its time — likely with a herd — as an infant and juvenile, then as …

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New Research Shows

Trilobites had well-developed gill-like structures in their upper leg branches, according to a new imaging study led by the University of California, Riverside. Trilobite fossil preserved in pyrite. Image credit: Jin-Bo Hou / University of California, Riverside. Trilobites are extinct marine arthropods that dominated the ecosystems of the Paleozoic era. …

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Coffee Consumption

Higher intake of caffeinated coffee was found to be associated with reduced risk of heart failure in three large, well-known heart disease studies: the FHS (Framingham Heart Study), CHS (Cardiovascular Heart Study), and ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities). Drinking one or more cups of caffeinated coffee may reduce heart failure …

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Spinosaurus Predator

The giant dinosaur Spinosaurus acted like modern herons or storks, taking fish and other aquatic prey from the edges of water or in shallow water, but also foraging for terrestrial prey and scavenging on occasion, according to new research by paleontologists from Queen Mary University of London, the University of …

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Bees And Fruit Flies

Neonicotinoid insecticides, such as imidacloprid, clothianidin, thiamethoxam and thiacloprid, affect the amount of sleep taken by both buff-tailed bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) and fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), according to two new studies led by University of Bristol researchers. The buff-tailed bumblebee (Bombus terrestris). Image credit: Myriam. “The neonicotinoids we tested had …

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